Notes and references in scrivener

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Usodimare
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Thu Jul 12, 2018 10:47 am Post

Hello there,
I am planning to use Scrivener to write up my PhD thesis, but first would lke to know if it can do what I need it for. The thesis is organised on three levels: 1) the main fictional text; 2) long endnotes referring to that text; 3) short footnotes providing references to the fictional text and the endnotes. I have two questions: MS Word cannot insert footnotes in an endnote, can Scrivener do this? If it cannot as I believe, is there a walk around to achieve my goal? Cheers

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mbbntu
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Thu Jul 12, 2018 4:11 pm Post

I used Scrivener for my PhD thesis, and I would not want to attempt any long-form writing in any other program. That said, my thesis was rather more "conventional" in layout.

I'm not quite sure what you are trying to do, and whether by "references" you mean links or pointers to other parts of the text, or commentary on the text. But whatever it is you mean, I would be surprised if you could not find some sort of solution in Scrivener -- it is a remarkably flexible program, and people here are very willing to help.

Are you an Italian-speaker? "Walk around" instead of "work round" is the kind of mistake that my students in Italy often made :D
You should judge people not by how close they get to the top, but by how far they have come from the bottom. Some people have a mountain to climb just to get to the place where others start out. (Me, 2010)

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AmberV
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Thu Jul 12, 2018 4:20 pm Post

Is this not a limitation in most word processing formats in general? I have yet to come across anything (outside of LaTeX, which Scrivener can do by the way) that lets you do that without manually formatting the lists—i.e. to simulate the effect by typing in the letters/number markers yourself and creating a list at the end of the document with indents and so forth. What I’m driving at here is that since Scrivener works from a basic floor of what can be done with RTF, if RTF cannot do it (and if Word can’t, then it is likely RTF cannot since they support the full spec) then neither would Scrivener.
.:.
Ioa Petra'ka
“Whole sight, or all the rest is desolation.” —John Fowles

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Usodimare
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Fri Jul 13, 2018 8:00 am Post

Thank you very much for your help. Avoiding LaTeX I will try the manual solution you suggest, that is place the long endnotes in individual sub-documents, add the bibliographic short footnotes as normal in each document, and format the endnotes manually at the end. Cheers,
Paolo


PS Indeed I am Italian :shock: thanks for correcting me!

mb
mbbntu
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Fri Jul 13, 2018 9:13 am Post

Ex Lettore di madrelingua straniera presso un paio di università nel Veneto :D . Molti italiani fanno fatica pronunciare bene walk/work. Sono vocali che non esistono in italiano. Poi, vedono la parola "fork" e pensano che la pronuncia di "work" dovrebbe essere simile -- ma non è vero!

In bocca al lupo!
You should judge people not by how close they get to the top, but by how far they have come from the bottom. Some people have a mountain to climb just to get to the place where others start out. (Me, 2010)

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AmberV
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Fri Jul 13, 2018 5:57 pm Post

That sounds like a good plan to me! You could even get a little bit fancy with this idea and use Scrivener’s auto-numbering feature to handle that part of it for you at least.

Something like Insert ▸ Auto-Number ▸ a. b. c. for starters (you can just type it in, but that’s handy if you don’t have all of the codes memorised!), then modify it to “<$l#name>”. The “name” part here is up to you, presumably something short and simple to identify this reference by. Then in your endnote, you would use “,<$l:name>”. The difference between these two is that the first is a reference to a number code, and the second is where the numbering actually takes place. So the list of endnotes is generating the numbers, and you are free to put the reference points wherever you need to, they don’t have to be in any particular order—they will use the number associated with that “name”, whatever it might be. Hence:

Code: Select all

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat.[<$l#something>]

BIBLIOGRAPHY

[<$l:something>] blah blah blah...


Will become this when compiled:

Code: Select all

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat.[a]

BIBLIOGRAPHY

[a] blah blah blah...


And of course that will all work inside of a footnote too.
.:.
Ioa Petra'ka
“Whole sight, or all the rest is desolation.” —John Fowles

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B Zhang
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Sun Jul 22, 2018 3:17 pm Post

I understand I can use @ number to insert page number,,.but how could I insert other details such as part, sec, para, etc,?

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AmberV
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Sun Jul 22, 2018 4:28 pm Post

Within an endnote? I presume you would type these bibliographic details in, or be using some citation management software to help handle that detail for you—but I’m not quite sure what it is you are asking.

The topic here by the way is how to link to an endnote from within a footnote or vice versa (and incidentally it refers to macOS specific methods for doing so).
.:.
Ioa Petra'ka
“Whole sight, or all the rest is desolation.” —John Fowles