Novel-in-a-Day 3: With a Vengeance

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VDGriesdoorn
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Tue Oct 22, 2013 12:56 pm Post

gr wrote:
r6d2 wrote:"And speaking of which... What happened to FBI Agent Gallagher?"


He met with the untimely death that suited him, no doubt.

-gr



That's just masterly.

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homeport
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Tue Oct 22, 2013 1:31 pm Post

I got quite attached to him too :)

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robertdguthrie
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Tue Oct 22, 2013 2:16 pm Post

r6d2 wrote:Is it that you people have real lives to worry about? (since I'm located closer to the planet core than the average life form, I'm feeling so lonely now... :-)

I'm slow to add things to my reading pile, though I did get started. Keith's chapter is so far the most memorable for me. I like the noir elements, and how dumb he made Bobby. :)

Br
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Tue Oct 22, 2013 3:23 pm Post

In awe of what Pigfender et al achieved in a day (though a lot more than a day's worth of work goes into the novel). Out of curiosity, how many downloads have the NIAD books achieved? Hope the numbers are high—a just return for all that work.

Congratulations to, and admiration for, everyone involved.

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r6d2
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Tue Oct 22, 2013 3:47 pm Post

pigfender wrote:I've bartered household chores for some laptop time and updated the files again.

Well, now hat you removed matt's laptop from the NiaD you can keep it for yourself and thus won't need begging to Mrs pigfender for laptop time ever again ;-)

pigfender made some statements which rephrased r6's comments in a way that absolutely twisted their original meaning, and thus wrote:responses that made r6 no sense at all, leaving him more confused than he was before.

What can I say... Bazinga! :-)

pigfender, kinda. No wait he did actually say this wrote:The best cure I am aware of is the conveniently scheduled NaNoWriMo.

I'd love to join this year's NaNoWriMo, really. But the rules state that you cannot start with a base project you've been working on, you must start from scratch. My current WIP is already about 40% written (First Draft), and I have to deliver it by mid December, so starting a new project during November would definitely jeopardize my chances to complete both, I think.

r6
r6d2
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Tue Oct 22, 2013 3:59 pm Post

robertdguthrie wrote:Keith's chapter is so far the most memorable for me. I like the noir elements, and how dumb he made Bobby. :)

I really liked that chapter too.

SPOILER AHEAD

And if the whole bottle-in-the-head wheel-getting-loose is a subplot he created and was not on the original script, I think it's really brilliant how he inserted it and resolved it so cleanly and conveniently.

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Jaysen
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Tue Oct 22, 2013 6:15 pm Post

I'm up to chapter 8.
Fun read so far.
I keep waiting for things to get picked up that simply won't. Who are the rednecks Kb introduced? Feels like a larger purpose there. ETC. That's just an artifact of the method used. Kind of fun but kind of "ARRGHHHRRR!!! close the loop!!!!!" at the same time.

the one "complaint" that i would have is linguistic-ish. As a native speaker/reader of AMERICAN english, certain phrases are very grating:
* "he was in hospital" would be said as "he was in THE hospital" by every American.
* "black highly polished shoes" would be "highly polished black shoes".
there are a few more but they are all based on American v Kings english phrasing. I've been around the fora long enough to figure out the translation...

I would also point out that I'm an uneducate, mountain hick who barely speaks hick-english right so smarter minds may look at me and say "you's dummer 'en-a box o' rocks 'en you's aint speakin' fer us".

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homeport
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Tue Oct 22, 2013 8:21 pm Post

Jaysen wrote:I'm up to chapter 8.
Fun read so far.
I keep waiting for things to get picked up that simply won't. Who are the rednecks Kb introduced? Feels like a larger purpose there. ETC. That's just an artifact of the method used. Kind of fun but kind of "ARRGHHHRRR!!! close the loop!!!!!" at the same time.

the one "complaint" that i would have is linguistic-ish. As a native speaker/reader of AMERICAN english, certain phrases are very grating:
* "he was in hospital" would be said as "he was in THE hospital" by every American.
* "black highly polished shoes" would be "highly polished black shoes".
there are a few more but they are all based on American v Kings english phrasing. I've been around the fora long enough to figure out the translation...

I would also point out that I'm an uneducate, mountain hick who barely speaks hick-english right so smarter minds may look at me and say "you's dummer 'en-a box o' rocks 'en you's aint speakin' fer us".


As it was my grammar picked up I had a look about found this:
http://www.stenstroms.com/en/shirt-know ... ress-code/
A grey or black hat in a matching colour is quite appropriate for larger official events. Black, highly polished shoes and black or grey socks are essential. If the morning coat is to be worn

So its not just me but sorry my grammar was so grating as a resident of the UK side of the pond

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AmberV
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Tue Oct 22, 2013 10:39 pm Post

Moderator Note: Thread moved to NaNo Materials to avoid clogging the announcement feeds (a little late, yes).
.:.
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Montree_Whiles
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Wed Oct 23, 2013 1:20 am Post

I for one love the UK dialects, Manchester being my fave. Having read Agatha Christie from a very young age, I also have acquired just a few "linguistic" practices when I write. I'm forever taking the u out of things ending in or. I think the dialectual (sp?) differences in English in general are fascinating, and thus, wouldn't change those elements in our "babies" from this and the past two years.

homeport wrote:So its not just me but sorry my grammar was so grating as a resident of the UK side of the pond


I have some ideas. I believe PF has joked every year about its being his last year with NIAD. How about a divvying up of the tasks? Like, one, have a person make the reminder contact a few months prior to previous folks to see if they'll show and keep the list of participants updated and then the follow up correspondence. Have someone else send out the schnitzel with the info. Dropbox makes it so all PF has to do is up load it. He or his helper can create a folder for each participant and then give them access to their own folder. A third person can so something else. I don't know how you might break things down PF, but if you delegate some of the tasks that would free up your time needed to create the master plan, then perhaps it won't be so daunting a prospect each year. Once all is said and done someone can do the compiling/formating and after running it by you get it all posted. I'm I too far afield?

I'm on chapter 3 and hope to delve back into it tonight. I even posted a link at work for folks to download if they wanted, then worried that the content I've not read might violate someone's sense of propriety or something. Oh, well. I like not knowing how the book will go. Hopefully that won't change.
“Writing is not necessarily something to be ashamed of, but do it in private and wash your hands afterwards.”
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gr
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Wed Oct 23, 2013 4:44 am Post

The term that stood out for me -- and it was used consistently throughout the novel whenever we were at someone's house (or safehouse as the case may be) -- was 'lounge'. Every house had a lounge -- a room quite unheard of in these parts. I am pretty sure those chapters were written by people far and wide, so I am suspecting a common cause -- floor plans in some people's packets perhaps?

gr

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matt
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Wed Oct 23, 2013 7:17 am Post

gr wrote:The term that stood out for me -- and it was used consistently throughout the novel whenever we were at someone's house (or safehouse as the case may be) -- was 'lounge'. Every house had a lounge -- a room quite unheard of in these parts. I am pretty sure those chapters were written by people far and wide, so I am suspecting a common cause -- floor plans in some people's packets perhaps?

gr


No floor plans that I saw... maybe we all just have lounges?

As an Australian, perfectly unremarkable to me, to the point that I assumed it was entirely non-regional and absolutely common everywhere.

It's not like it is a "sitting room", which no one outside of pre-1900s Britain has ever had!
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Siren
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Wed Oct 23, 2013 8:07 am Post

Jaysen wrote:"he was in hospital" would be said as "he was in THE hospital" by every American.

Interesting, as I would read these two statements as meaning different things in UK English. If you are "in hospital", then you have been admitted to hospital as a patient. If you are "in the hospital", this is simply a statement of location (similar to "in the cinema" or "in the garden"), so it could apply equally to visitors, staff or delivery men as well as to people receiving medical treatment.
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pigfender
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Wed Oct 23, 2013 9:13 am Post

I had assumed that there was only one hospital in the entire United States.

Anyone interested in the Scrivener Project file used in the preparation and compilation of this year's NiaD should head on over to: http://www.pigfender.com/index.php/2013 ... -in-a-day/

Ioa, could you add a link to this page to the opening post? Also, would you mind replacing the download links you put on the opening post to the page link: http://www.pigfender.com/index.php/2013 ... niad-2013/
You're giving me all of the bandwidth for the downloads but none of the pageviews!
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Montree_Whiles
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Wed Oct 23, 2013 11:31 am Post

Am I missing something? Everything seems to be blank. Would it be different for the windows version? I have all the cork board stuff with nothing on the cards.

pigfender wrote:Anyone interested in the Scrivener Project file used in the preparation and compilation of this year's NiaD should head on over to: http://www.pigfender.com/index.php/2013 ... -in-a-day/
“Writing is not necessarily something to be ashamed of, but do it in private and wash your hands afterwards.”
—Robert A. Heinlein

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